12 Years Factory SV-618 Acetic Glass Sealant Supply to Zimbabwe

12 Years Factory
 SV-618 Acetic Glass Sealant Supply to Zimbabwe
  • 12 Years Factory
 SV-618 Acetic Glass Sealant Supply to Zimbabwe12 Years Factory
 SV-618 Acetic Glass Sealant Supply to Zimbabwe
  • 12 Years Factory
 SV-618 Acetic Glass Sealant Supply to Zimbabwe12 Years Factory
 SV-618 Acetic Glass Sealant Supply to Zimbabwe

Short Description:

Description It is one-component acetoxy silicone sealant with fungicide to form a durable and flexible rubber seal resistant to water, mildew and mold.   Where to use SV-618  is an excellent candidate to consider the reliable prevention of mildew formation around fixtures in high humidity and temperature areas such as bath and kitchen rooms, swimming pool, facilities and lavatories. It also has good adhesion to most common building materials e.g. glass, tiles, ceramics and fiber glass, painte...


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Product Tags

abide by the contract", conforms to the market requirement, joins in the market competition by its high quality as well as provides more comprehensive and excellent service for clients to let them become big winner. The pursue of the company, is the clients' satisfaction for 12 Years Factory SV-618 Acetic Glass Sealant Supply to Zimbabwe, We welcome you to visit our factory and look forward to establishing friendly business relationships with customers at home and abroad in the near future.


Description

It is one-component acetoxy silicone sealant with fungicide to form a durable and flexible rubber seal resistant to water, mildew and mold.

 

Where to use

SV-618  is an excellent candidate to consider the reliable prevention of mildew formation around fixtures in high humidity and temperature areas such as bath and kitchen rooms, swimming pool, facilities and lavatories. It also has good adhesion to most common building materials e.g. glass, tiles, ceramics and fiber glass, painted wood.

 

Key Features

1. 100% silicone

2. Easy to apply

3. Highly efficient and safe bactericide

4. Low VOC

5. Proven Performer

 

Technical data sheet

Technical data sheet for reference,

  Test standard 1000
Appearance ISO 11600 Have no grain, no agglomerations
Extrudability,g/ml ISO 8394 450
Tack Free Time,min ASTM C 679 20
Density,g/cm3 ISO 1183 1.0
Slump,mm ISO 7390 0
Heat weight loss,% ISO 10563 7
Ultimate Tensile Strength,MPa ISO 8339 0.4
Ultimate Elongation,% ISO 8339 150
Ultimate Shear Strength, MPa ISO 4587 N/A

 

Certification

JC/T885-2001 20LM; and GB/T1741-2007 Mildew Proofing Grade 0

 

Color

clear, black, silver gray, white

 

Package

300ml in cartridge * 24 per box

 

Shelf life

12 months

 

Note

If you want the TDS or MSDS or other details, please contact with our sales person.

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  • A few people have asked about the products that were used for this project…

    The first layer (troweled over the metal lathe to about 1/4″ thickness) can be a high-polymer thinset mortar that is normally used for setting porcelain tiles. For added flexibility and stickiness, polymer admix can be used instead of water when preparing the mix. The second layer can be a polymer enriched sanded grout, again prepared with polymer admix instead of water. And the third and final layer(s) can be unsanded grout without the polymer addition (the top layers want to not be so sticky). The sanding steps don’t really have to be intensive if your trowel work produces the flatness that you desire.

    For this project I made my own mixes using raw cement, lime, and fancier cementitious materials just because I wanted to learn and experiment. But over-the-counter materials as mentioned in the above paragraph are essencially the same. To finish I used a few coats of a food-safe solvent based tile sealer, the kind used for non glazed porcelain and terracotta tiles, followed by a cocktail mixture of tung oil, natural solvent, beeswax, and carnuba wax to seal the surface.

    It has been a year and a half since the project was completed, and I WOULD do this again. You should know however that the surface DOES “stain.” Over time and use it develops a patina. Common use areas morph into different shades and colors depending on what was above those areas and for how long. This may be a deal-breaker for some people, however this is exactly the look I was trying to achieve. Over time the varying shades blend into use-shapes as you would expect for example from leather or copper goods. It should also be mentioned that doing a concrete counter this way as opposed to the pour-in method or making a mold, saved many hundreds of extra pounds of dead weight sitting on the cabinets and weighing down on the foundation.

    Lastly – to get experience with the process I experimented with a couple af ad hoc counters to be used as gardening tables (seen in the very early parts of the video). This ended up to be very important since from the start I realized I was going to make a big mess.

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